Monthly Speakers and Discussion Topics

Group Discussion

17 November 2020
This will be our final session for 2020 and a chance to reflect on the year and our own musical vision and aspirations. It will be an opportunity to discuss what worked well, and what we might change in 2021.

 

Given that we have now used up 10% of the decade in which we need to halve global emissions, I thought it might be useful for a reality check. One of the best and most troubling articles I have read recently is by Joëlle Gergis, recently published in the Guardian. It is not easy reading, but it is powerful and, I think, motivating. It is increasingly clear to me that the climate crisis is the most urgent challenge we face and needs to be society’s number one priority, the yardstick by which we measure everything we do.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/oct/15/the-great-unravelling-i-never-thought-id-live-to-see-the-horror-of-planetary-collapse

 

Dr Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer based at the Australian National University. She is a lead author of the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment report, and an expert advisor to the Climate Council. She also wrote a fascinating and ground breaking book, Sunburnt Country: the history and future of climate change in Australia, a terrific read.

 

 

Dean Lombard

17 October 2020

Dean Lombard is a musician and renewable energy expert and will talk about the big issues in transitioning to a 100% renewable energy grid (including a bit of myth busting) and also about what we can do in our own homes and communities to play a part!

 

He will hopefully play a tune or two with us!

 

Dean is a songwriter and earned a living from music for a few years in the 1980s, busking and playing covers in pubs, before heading into the less lucrative but more satisfying world of playing original music in bands – including Wild Honey in the 1990s and The Phosphenes since 2000 – while working as a social worker and social policy advocate to pay the bills. Dean started working in energy policy in 2005 as a consumer advocate and policy analyst for the Victorian Council of Social Service. Since 2016 he’s been doing the same at environmental not-for-profit Renew, with a focus on supporting household and community owned renewable energy resources and transforming the energy market to better integrate large scale renewables. After hours, he is co-convenor of the Darebin Songwriters Guild, facilitates the Guild’s songwriting workshop program, runs open mics in Footscray (currently held online), plays with the Phosphenes, plays and records as a solo artist, and does freelance recording, production, and session work. http://deanlombard.com.au/

Dr Christina Green 

19th September 2020

Bearing Witness: Bringing benefit to others through our music;

Dr Christina Green is a part of the Musicians Climate Crisis Network and has studied, written and performed music since the early 1980s. She has a wealth of experience and recently completely a PhD in Composition and Musicology. 

 

She will led us in this session, outlining her journey through creating and performing music that matters:

 

  • Writing music in an appropriate way about difficult issues (such as how white folk can sensitively support Black Lives Matters)

  • Writing music that bears witness and brings awareness (drawing from her long term Buddhist practice) 

  • Writing music that draws on feminist, queer theory and environmental consciousness (inclusivity in music).

  • Finally, some practical reflections on the challenging art of getting ones music 'out there' and being OK with what comes.

 

This session will provide a fantastic opportunity to think about and explore things we don’t useful get an opportunity to discuss, in a respectful, inclusive and supportive environment.

Charlie Mcgee 

22nd August 2020

Charlie Mgee from Formidable Vegetable  http://www.formidablevegetable.com/

 

Charlie is a leading exponent of Ecological Electro Funk Swing music that, as internationally renowned activist Dr Vandana Shiva describes, 'connects the creativity of nature with the creativity of music’.  

 

Charlie has been writing, practicing and singing about permaculture, and more widely about humans and the planet for a number of years, filling venues (and dance floors) around the world at across music festivals and gigs. Charlie, along with Kylie Morrigan and Mal Webb, core members of FV, were programmed to play at Glastonbury this year, but Charlie decided to not travel due to the ecological issue with flying. They ended up playing anyway … on line! 

 

Charlie willto talk about his musical journey in using music to tell stories of the earth, what he’s learnt and his thoughts of the roles music can play in creating the new cultural narratives we need.

Dr Beth Hill

18th July 2020

Dr Beth Hill from Psychology for a Safe Climate 


I met Beth at a Storying Climate workshop at the University of Melbourne and she has a lot of experience in helping groups navigate the troubling emotions raised by the climate crisis. Add to this the profound social challenges of Covid-19 and the rawness of Black Live Matter, it is a good time to have a chance to sit and process some of this.

 

Beth will talk a little about what Psychology for a Safe Climate does, which is to help foster emotional engagement with climate change. That is what musicians do as well.  But then take us on a short process she uses with some of the groups she works with. There will be plenty of time to talk, and I hope to think about how our music and art can be a force for good in troubling times

Group Discussion

20 June 2020

We will read and discuss some articles around the challenging issue of  food, agriculture, the corona virus. Please try to read them and come ready to discuss. 

 

Food is personal and cultural, very close to people’s hearts (well, the stomach is!). Yet, how we produce and consume food is a significant contribution. Yet, food and agriculture is rarely addressed in music. We will have a conversation about these issues and what they might mean for us as musicians and songwriters. 

The two links: 

 

Eat less meat: UN climate-change report calls for change to human diet

 

This, published in the world's most prestigious science journal NATURE, summarises the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s 2019 special report on Land and Food. It is easy to read I found it really useful as a guide to the latest analysis. 

 

The End of Meat Is Here, by Jonathan Saffron Foer. It is fairly short and deals with COVID-19, racial and social justice, climate change and animals. Foer is the author of Eating Animals which I read recently; a deeply thoughtful, humane, nuanced and in many ways, difficult book to read. And deeply honest. He is a vegetarian, on and off … which is why his writing feels so authentic!   

    

The overall challenge is that we are eating tomorrow, to borrow from Prof Tim Wise, and industrial agricultural is, literally, poisoning our ecosystems. Widespread animal consumption has risen for about 7 billion animals when I was born, to a staggering 70 billion today and projected to keep growing. (Add another 100 billion farmed fish … and over a trillion wild caught fish per year and we start to see the scale of our planetary plundering). Much of this drives emissions (direct from livestock) and the vast amount of oil used for fertilisers and production systems. 

 

What can we do differently? And how can artists reflect this and telling stories that help this transition too a greener low emissions food system? Changing long seated habits is tough for the most willing of us. At least as artists, we are used to reflecting what we think and feel in our music and art. 

 

I am sure we will have lots of thoughts and ideas and inevitably differing views and priorities. There are no simplistic answers to these challenges, but this is society-wide conversation we can’t put off. 

Stephan Crawford 

16 May 2020

I am delighted that Stephan Crawford, the founder of the influential The ClimateMusic Project based in San Francisco will join us for our next Musicians Climate Crisis Network meeting on Saturday 16th May at 10.00am 

 

I met with Stephan and his colleagues last year In San Fransisco and was luckily enough with my timing to be able to attend a ClimateMusic Project concert that night featuring students and faculty from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music who had written a number of amazing pieces addressing climate change. I was really inspired by this collaboration of science and music and would love to see something like this in Australia. 

 

Read about them here https://climatemusic.org/ and also a great New York Times article about the project.

 

Stephan will talk about the project and the future. It will be fascinating so I encourage you to Zoom in. This is a rare opportunity to hear about a truly innovation music-climate project. 

Group Discussion

Prof Susie Crate  

28 March 2020

Special guest Susie Crate  Professor of Anthropology at George Mason University, story teller and musician) will join us via Zoom. It not to be missed and will be a fascinating discussion about climate change and community in Siberia, a part of the world most of us will never see, and the role of story telling. Susie has a long history of anthropological research engagement with the social and environmental issues of the region and around permafrost. Most of all, she will tell us some stories about what she has witnessed in the dramatically changing environment of Siberia.

And what is song writing if not the telling of stories.

Copyright Simon Kerr 2020